Puke Ariki - Museum, Libraries, Tourist Information

Home

Record Image

Record Image

Record Image

Record Image

Record Image

Record Image

Accession No A79.966
Name/Title Huruhuru Kuri
Primary Maker Rawahotana
Primary Prod Role Maker
Primary Prod Date 1800-1810
Primary Prod Period 1800s
Brief Description A large cloak made from skins of eight original Maori dogs (Canis domesticus). Four brown and four white. The pelts sewn together with strips of dog hide using what has been described as a french seam. The dogs ears and tails can be seen
Classification Clothing - Outerwear/Clothing/Personal Artifacts
Department Maori
Collection W.H. Skinner Collection
Media/Materials Dog Skin
Subject Category Taonga/Maori
Native/Fauna/Natural science
Extinct/Fauna/Natural science
Subject Person Taranaki Iwi
Credit Line W.H. Skinner purchased this cloak from Whakatau (chief of the Taranaki tribe of Te Namu who at the time was believed to be aged about 75-80 years old) at Parihaka in June 1885 for 4 pounds.

Taken from W.H. Skinner's diary: Monday 17 June 1889 (ARC2001-165/3)

"Walked up to Parihaka directly after breakfast to finish my dealings left again about 1/2 past 1. The prices I gave seem very high but I am confident that they're really worth double the money. I brought two spears splendid decorated with dogs hair and feathers 4 [pounds]. Te Whiti says this is the oldest mat in Parihaka and the only one of its kind, he says it is quite 80 yrs olds, that is to his knowledge. , 1 whale bone meri [mere] - fiddle shaped - old with dog skin larkings attached 2.10.0 1 small greenstone tiki not a very good one 1 [pound] 2 large wooden hooks, bone pointed, and 3 paua small hooks 7/- 1 korowai mat good of its kind 7/6, spent in all about 18 pound, this included tips etc etc. Hickman kindly refused to take anything for my meals."

Taken from a letter written by W.H. Skinner to T. White and transcribed in White's 1891 article in the Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute, p. 544-545:

"The mat was purchased by myself at Parihaka in June, 1889. The fact of my having purchased the mat caused quite a small sensation at Parihaka, and a friend of mine, being in the village the following day [possibly Thomas Hickman- see reference above] overheard Te Whiti and several of the older men discussing the affair and the history of the mat."
+ Add Comment