Highlights

Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

To honour the life of Queen Elizabeth II, Puke Ariki has curated a collection of items from our Heritage Collection. This collection represents two of The Queen’s notable visits to our region during her reign: once in 1954 over the 8 and 9 January she visited Taranaki as part of her Royal Tour of New Zealand following her coronation; and again in 1977 for her Silver Jubilee tour visiting eleven centres throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.

Impermanence

Impermanence

Pat Greenfield was born in Nottingham, England on 8 March 1946. Pat is a self-taught Taranaki based photographer and self-described archivist recording "history as it happens now".

She undertook a photography course by correspondence through the New York Institute of Photography, which taught her the technicalities of photographic production.

This body of work is a 20 year photographic and scientific journey of discovery into the effects of climate change along the Taranaki coastline.

There is a particular emphasis on the Three Sisters Beach and the neighbouring Four Brothers Beach. We are shown the growing and often dramatic impact storms and earthquakes have had on our vulnerable coastline. Tongapōrutu has one of the fastest eroding coastlines in the world, were the erosion is measurable within human timeframes.

John Bevan Ford Artworks

John Bevan Ford Artworks

John Bevan Ford (1930-2005) (Ngāti Raukawa) was known for his colourful and intricate ink drawings based on Te Ao Māori. Exploring personal and Māori worldviews through the patterns found in raranga (weaving), kōwhaiwhai (rafter paintings), korowai (cloaks) and whakairo (carving), he established himself as a leading contemporary Māori artist.

This significant collection of work by Ford was mostly gifted to Puke Ariki by the artist in the 1990s. Ford lived in New Plymouth from the mid-1950s till 1967 and was part of an art collective called Group 60 that also included Taranaki artists Michael Smither and Don Driver.